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Wisconsin Lemon Law

Wisconsin Lemon Law

Purchasing a lemon is a frightening prospect. Wisconsin lemon law aims to protect consumers from dishonest and dangerous sale tactics. If you suspect that your new vehicle is defective, the law offices of Allen Stewart will help get you back on the road.

What is lemon law?

Approximately one percent of vehicles sold in the United States each year are lemons. This statistic may be low as manufacturers are not required to report the number of defective vehicles.

Defective vehicles are a danger to both the purchaser and others. Stalling unexpectedly on a busy street or highway places you and the people near you at significant risk of death or injury.

To combat the danger that defective vehicles pose, states impose lemon laws. This allows you to sue a dealer or manufacturer to recoup the cost of your vehicle and be made whole again. Penalties may also be available. The idea is to penalize the seller and protect both the buyer and others.

Is my car a lemon?

Not every vehicle is a lemon. Problems occurring for strain or regular wear and tear do not fall under most state laws. Typically, the term pertains to highly flawed products.

Defects in workmanship caused by a manufacturing error or design flaw fall under almost every law. Incorrect installation is a common source of this problem. The weight of the law often forces manufacturers to issue a recall.

Lemon laws also seek to protect buyers of used vehicles. The regulation seeks to eliminate defects from repairing heavily damaged cars and trucks. You should always be aware of the practice of cut and shut or clipping where a damaged section is replaced with similar parts. Vehicles manufactured after 1987 tend to fail at higher rates when repaired in this way.

Am I protected in Wisconsin?

To reduce the risk to drivers, Wisconsin enacted a lemon law. The law allows a claim to be filed if your new car needs repair for 30 days or more in the first year of ownership. Problems experienced immediately after purchase do not qualify your car as a lemon.

Any owner experiencing the same problem three or more times can submit information for consideration under the law. Regulations apply to leased vehicles and motorcycles.

What do I do if my car is a lemon?

Do not just drop off your vehicle at the dealership. This is known as voluntary repossession and negatively effects your credit. A consumer attorney is well suited to file a claim and help with damages and other issues.

We recommend holding on to any claim to suitability. Invoices, receipts, and promises help build a solid case and reduce your loss.

Wisconsin Lemon Law attorneys

Allen Stewart is a bar-certified attorney with experience across the country. Our team of experienced legal professionals helps clients in many areas with victories in the car and pharmaceutical industries.

If you suspect that your new or used vehicle is a lemon, get in touch with our team and schedule an intake appointment today.

 

Wisconsin Lemon Law
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